Enviously Green

Gemma Kent surveys two of UCC’s core endeavours in the field of sustainability, the “Love Our Library” Campaign and the work of the Environmental Research Institute. In 2010, University College Cork became the first institute of higher-education in the world to be awarded a Green Flag. At the heart of this first milestone in UCC’s efforts to promote and improve its work around sustainability was … Continue reading Enviously Green

An Ode to (Good) Sports Writing

Killian Down What’s something everyone around you knows you’re obsessed with and why? Someone once described Mancunian band Elbow’s album, The Take Off and Landing of Everything, as an epic of the everyday, a romance of the real. It was an allusion to lyrics which draw on reserves of emotion usually saved for grand romance, but spill out in Guy Garvey’s gentle drawl and find … Continue reading An Ode to (Good) Sports Writing

“The World’s Largest Fossil”

Isobel Creedon breaks down what she has learned from David Attenborough’s Great Barrier Reef Over the last 30 years we have lost approximately 50% of the Great Barrier Reef. Worldwide, it is reported that 19% of coral reefs are dead, according to Worldwatch Institute. There are many different threats to coral reefs and reasons behind these living organisms’ deaths; however climate change due to damaging … Continue reading “The World’s Largest Fossil”

Princess Mononoke: Our Relationship with Nature

Miyazaki’s masterpiece explores the turbulent relationship between man and the natural world, writes Kieran Enright When I first stumbled upon Studio Ghibli, I was immediately taken aback by the style and tone of its tales. Unlike its Western counterparts, these epics deal with conflicts of ideals, and question the resilience of the human condition. Hayao Miyazaki, the powerhouse behind the studio, intersects his stories with … Continue reading Princess Mononoke: Our Relationship with Nature

Do As I Say, and Not As I Do

Katie Burke tackles ‘feminist’ fashion With the changing of the seasons, fashion not only presents us with new fabrics, silhouettes and colour trends, but also a reflection of the society we live in. In the 1910s and 1920s, slightly shortened hemlines and less constricting dresses reflected the economic consequences of war, and the practicalities of protesting on the streets for women’s suffrage. Meanwhile, the 1970s … Continue reading Do As I Say, and Not As I Do